Yellow Perfection tomatoes from 2014 harvest

Yellow Perfection Tomato

Details

  • Open-Pollinated
  • Type: indeterminate
  • Shape: round slicer or salad tomato
  • Color: golden yellow
  • Maturity: 70-75 days
    • 2010: 63 days to 1st harvest
    • 2011: 84-91 days to 1st harvest
    • 2012: 84 days to 1st harvest
    • 2013: 49 days to 1st harvest
  • Size: small; “4-6 oz”; “3-5 oz”
    • 2009: too small for my liking; don’t think any were bigger than an ounce or two
    • 2010, 2011, 2012: 0.75 oz
    • 2013: 1 oz
  • Yield: “productive”
    • 2009: good production
    • 2010: 52 tomatoes, 2.5 lbs per plant
    • 2011: 46 tomatoes, 2.25 lbs per plant
    • 2012: 5 tomatoes, 4 oz
    • 2013: 14 tomatoes, 13 oz
  • Taste: “delicious, juicy”
  • Disease Resistance:

Notes:

  • Seeds of Change: “Salad tomato from an old British seed company”

Sources: (where to buy)

  • Seeds of Change

Results from My Garden:

  • 2009: New addition from Seeds of Change in my 2009 garden: proved to be a bit too small for my tastes. Good flavor, though. Prone to cracking & spots. Produced quite a lot of fruit
  • 2010: No cracking this year! I think they were just getting too much water last year. They are a reliable producer – every day there are 5-10 ready to eat. As an appetizer, they were the guests’ favorite little tomato! Fusarium made its appearance this year; one or both of the Yellow Perfection plants got it
  • 2012: Both died by early July; planted extra one in mid-July, but it was probably too late in the season to put out
  • 2013: started 2 plants from seed; planted them both, but one was hit hard with curly top virus in early July, so I yanked it. The one survivor was a very poor producer – found out it had root-knot nematodes when I yanked it at the end of the season; it also had a wilt
  • 2014 grafting attempt: two attempts failed. The first attempt failed because the scion popped right off the rootstock (too much water pressure from rootstock?). The second attempt failed due to wilt then rot at the graft (too warm? non-sterile cut?)
SEASON SOURCE DATES SPACING PLANTS MATURITY YIELD PER PLANT AVG SIZE DISEASE
2009 SoC seeds 3/5 > 4/23 > 5/7 12×18″ 2 no records kept, but they were smaller than seed packet states cracking (too much water) & spots (?)
2010 SoC seeds 3/5 > 4/16 > 5/14 18×20″ 2 69 days 53 2.4 lbs 0.7 oz fusarium wilt; no cracking
2011 SoC seeds 3/5 > 4/2 > 4/23 18×24″ 2 95 days 47 2.2 lbs 0.8 oz  
2012 SoC seeds 3/5 > 3/26 > 4/16 18×24″ 2 62 days 5 4 oz 0.8 oz some kind of wilt (bacterial?) both dead by mid July
2013 SoC seeds 3/5 > 4/2 > 5/21 24″ 2-1=1 56 days 14 0.8 lbs 1 oz RKNCTV and wilt (?)
2014 SoC seeds 3/8 > 4/15 > 5/6 & 5/15 21-24″ 2-2=0 59 days 43 2.6 lbs 1 oz V or F wilt (both dead by mid-Sep)

2 thoughts on “Yellow Perfection Tomato

  1. Robert Hutchinson

    Very interesting report on your Yellow Perfection Tomatoes. I live in Southern California so unlike gardeners back East I have the choice do I want to keep my tomato plants or not. I see you kept your Yellow Perfection Plants longer then one growing season. I take it you live in a climate that is mild? Found your data very interesting. Will try to keep my plants for next year. My first year I had a HUGE crop I could not believe how many tomatoes these plants produced. Thanks for the info.

    Reply
    1. ThePlantLady Post author

      Hi Robert,
      We always get a good cold winter, so I’ve never been able to carry my tomato plants over winter. Especially Yellow Perfection, since it almost always gets a wilt disease pretty early in the season.
      This year my one Yellow Perfection is still looking pretty good despite the wildfire that came through my neighborhood!
      Give it a try and let me know how it goes!
      -Lisa

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.